Title : Halal Market in Canada

: Admin | : 2017-06-10


Halal products are those that are "lawful" or "permitted" (Halal) according to Islamic laws. This excludes certain products and by-products that are unlawful/prohibited (Haram), such as swine/pork, those that have gone through improper slaughtering processes or been contaminated from Haram products/ingredients. The market for these food products has already seen notable growth and is expected to further grow in demand (Gooch et al. 23-24).

 

 

The North American Halal food market is growing at a rapid rate, with estimates from Consulting that the global market is $580 billion, and that global Halal trade is roughly worth $80 billion, or 5% of total agri-food product trade. It has been estimated that in the future, Halal trade might grow to account for 20% of the world's food trade. The North American market is currently estimated to be approximately $12 billion (Hogan "Halal 101"). A VCMC study on the Halal meat industry in North America, estimated that the Halal fresh meat market in 2010 was between $370-520 million (Gooch et al. 24).

With a notable and expanding Muslim population, Canada's Halal market is currently estimated at $1 billion (Hogan "Halal 101"). Growing at roughly a 13% annual growth rate, Canada's Muslim population is projected to represent 7% of Canada's total population by 2031. According to the VCMC, the majority of the Muslim population in Canada resides in Ontario (61%), followed by Quebec (19%), and British Columbia (10%). With regards to cities, the majority of Muslims live in Toronto (47%), Mississauga (12%) and Ottawa (9%): all located within Ontario. The Canadian Muslim population also represents an opportunistic consumer group whose characteristics include being well educated, larger households (4.4 people per household, as opposed to 2.5 per household on average), and commonly include meat as a part of their diet, spending more money on meat than the average consumer (Gooch et al. 19-20).

A number of large Halal brands are present in the Canadian market, including Al Safa, Maple Lodge – Zabiha Halal, Crescent Premium Foods Inc., Madina, and Spring Lamb/Opal Valley. These brands produce a variety of fresh and frozen, value-added processed, and deli/wiener products, with a range of options that include chicken, lamb, beef, turkey and vegetarian products, and several pizza products (25).

According to the VCMC, outside of Canada, export opportunities are available for a variety of products that cater to Muslim consumers. The majority of Islamic countries are also net food importers with significant young and growing populations, strong economic growth and rising incomes. These factors are particularly increasing demand for a wide range of Halal certified products in the Middle East, which already has a Muslim population of 475 million and imports over 80% of food requirements. It is estimated that the worldwide Muslim population may reach 2.2 billion by 2030; 35% of the world's population (Hogan "Halal 101").

Within the U.S., there is the Islamic Food and Nutrition Council of America (IFANCA), which is a not-for-profit Islamic organization dedicated to supervising and certifying the production of Halal food products. Similarly to Canada, the growing Muslim and Jewish consumer populations in the U.S. are fuelling opportunities for Canadian Halal and Kosher food manufacturers who are looking to enter the market. With a Muslim population of over eight million, the U.S. can offer a growing and lucrative market to exporters ("Halal 101").

Reproduced as it is from http://www.agr.gc.ca

Source: http://www.agr.gc.ca/eng/industry-markets-and-trade/statistics-and-market-information/agriculture-and-food-market-information-by-region/canada/the-specialty-food-market-in-north-america/?id=1410083148460


Title : BEFORE YOU DINE ASK HALAL CERTIFICATE FROM A RESTAURANT

: Admin | : 2017-06-10


  • May 12 2016 
  • Restaurants declaring Halal lag behind with Halal Certification
  • CFIA regulates the Halal Certification but Follow-on is needed

While making a search about Halal serving restaurants, one would find every second Restaurant in GTA claiming to be Halal serving. When it comes to challenging them to prove with their FDA mandated and CFIA regulated Halal Certificate from a government recognized Halal Certifier, they fail to present such a Halal Certificate. Their excuse comes with a citation that they bought the Halal Meat from a Muslim Butcher or a claiming Halal Meat Butchery. Such a claim is not sufficient for two reasons:

  1. A claimant of Halal Butchery must get certification from a Certifier (i.e. CHFCA).
  2. A claimant of Halal Food serving Restaurant must be Halal Certified (i.e. CHFCA).

Halal certification is not only about Halal Red Meat and Halal Poultry but the ingredients added in the process, the flavourings and the person processing such a Halal Food must be qualified enough to make the prepared food Halal Assured. For this reason, a Restaurant must be Halal Certified if claiming to be Halal.

Canadian Halal Food Certifying Agency (CHFCA) requests upon the Halal consuming community to use their rights to assure hundred percent satisfactions by seeking a Halal Certificate issued by a Certifier (i.e. CHFCA) to eradicate any chances of Haram in their holistic food.

Canadian Halal Food Certifying Agency (CHFCA) offers financially favourable, technically workable and Holistically Halal Certification to meet the requirements of Food and Drugs Acts (FDA) as recommended by Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), as per the reference number SOR/204 – 76 April, 2014 in Food and Drugs Act: B.01.050 [P.C. 2014-353 April 3, 2014].

  1.  CHFCA Tel: 905 673 6500
  2. Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/CHFCA2016/
  3. E-Mail: info@chfcahalal.com
  4. Website: www.chfcahalal.com

Title : MYTH: HAND SLAUGHTERED Vs MACHINE SLAUGHTERED

: Admin | : 2017-06-10


May 12 2016
Myth: Hand Slaughtered Vs Machine Slaughtered
Holistic and Scientific parameters would undo apprehensions

The parameter by which a slaughtered Zabeeha animal becomes permissible is same as in the Hand Slaughtered or the Machine Slaughtered. The principles of Halal and Zabeeha slaughtering are not negotiable and such could be met in both cases.

If speed of the machine slaughtering process does not match the Islamic definition of Halal, if 100% significance in approval cannot be achieved because of the automation and human errors, then there is always a materially innovative path to satisfy the fundamentals of Islamic slaughtering on such matters. It would require the WILL of the business operators to comply what is needed to make it 100% Holistic Halal Slaughter (HHS).

Same goes to the Hand Slaughter, if a single Islamic Scholastic Operator (ISO) is capable of slaughtering one chicken in 15 seconds then he / she cannot be expected to slaughter continually for eight hours to produce 1900 Hand Slaughtered Chickens (HSC). There would be human errors in the recitations of Tasmiyah as well as errors in slaughtering process too. To eradicate such errors in Hand slaughters, one would accommodate space, multiple Islamic scholastic operators, and limit the number of chickens which could be managed in such a facility. Otherwise, very famed Hand Slaughter would be worst than what one may perceive with same mode of machine slaughtering.

In Canada, 1.2 million (12,00,000) strong Muslim community must get most economical Halal Slaughtered Poultry (HSP) and such would not be possible unless Hand Slaughter Automation in Slaughtering are combined with Holistic and Scientific principles to produce Halal Meat and Poultry.

Canadian Halal Food Certifying Agency (CHFCA) audits, inspects, investigates Haram Critical Control Points (HCCP) and recommends Corrective Halal Actions (CHA) in a chain of claimed Halal Food Production (HFP) with 100% significance and approves Halal Accreditation accordingly. Keeping the trust between CHFCA & Food Manufacturers to provide Halal confidence is a Holistic approach for the satisfaction of all consumers.

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Title : Halal food is holistic and divinely regulated while its quality and safety is part of the Halal Food

: Admin | : 2017-06-10


Halal food is regulated by CFIA and safety regulations are equally effective as in other foods inspected and regulated by CFIA.

Halal food has gained the reputation of being more carefully produced and thoroughly inspected by Halal Certifying Agency

Zabeeha animals are slaughtered more humanely than conventional methods, and the facilities are blessed by a member of the religious organization to implement divine rules

Though not regulated yet, organic feeding to Zabeeha animals and raising the animals with more protective regulations against diseases and excessive usage of antibiotics and hormones would make it more close to organic ideals.


Title : Read More Halal: Happy National Grilled Cheese Day

: Admin | : 2017-06-10


To celebrate this delicious day, Huffington post has rounded up 22 of our favourite grilled cheese recipes from around the web. From a garlicky green Gouda grilled cheese to a raspberry Nutella and Mascarpone grilled sandwich, these recipes run from sweet to savoury, and even vegan filled — you'll definitely be able to find a sandwich that fits your taste buds. Being Halal conscious, always get Halal Certified poultry and meat products to passion in your taste.

Of course, if you prefer to leave your grilled cheese as is, you are not alone. According to a survey conducted by Kraft Singles, Atlantic Canadians are the country's biggest purists when it comes to the classic sandwich while Vancouverites and Albertans are the most likely to add greens and meats respectively. When looking for Halal Cheese, look out for Haram ingredients in Cheese and fetch with Halal ingredients. Most preferable in the Rennet would be Microbial Rennet, vegetable Rennet and even Calf rennet is genuinely good because in the final product it would be found even less than the trace amounts. Mind you, Calf Rennet is from Zabeeha Animal and it remains a Halal ingredient.

One of the most unexpected additions to a grilled cheese however would have to be love. According to a survey conducted last year by dating site Skout, grilled cheese lovers reported having more sex than grilled cheese haters. They were also found to be more generous.


Title : Safety for Food Employees equally matters

: Admin | : 2017-06-10


Meat Processor Fined $65,000 as Worker Losses Fingers

Courtesy: Ministry of Labour
 

BRAMPTON, ON - Cargill Limited, operating as Cargill Value Added Meats, pleaded guilty and has been fined $65,000 after a worker suffered the loss of fingers to exhaust fan blades.

On June 7, 2013, at the company's facility at 235 Nugget Court in Brampton, a worker was operating the ground beef pressing equipment that makes meat into patties before they enter the freezing conveyor. The meat patties, while being transported through the conveyor's 'flash/freeze' section, are sprayed with liquid nitrogen, creating a mist that exits through exhaust pipes located on the roof of the building. During the operation of the conveyor, the nitrogen - along with small pieces of ground beef - can freeze in the exhaust pipes. In turn, this can cause a build-up of ice at the opening of the exhaust pipes on the roof of the building. Maintenance workers would then normally use a rubber mallet to bang the exhaust pipe to clear any ice jams.

While attempting to clear the ice jam in the exhaust pipe, the worker put one hand in the pipe; the exhaust fan blades amputated several fingers, among other injuries.

In this incident, Cargill Limited committed the offence of failing as an employer to provide information, instruction and supervision to the worker to protect the health or safety of the worker, which is contrary to Section 25(2) (a) of the Occupational Health and Safety Act.

Following a guilty plea, the company was fined $65,000 by Justice of the Peace Noel Rohan in Brampton court on April 12, 2016.

In addition to the fine, the court imposed a 25-per-cent victim fine surcharge as required by the Provincial Offences Act. The surcharge is credited to a special provincial government fund to assist victims of crime.

Defendant:
Cargill Limited operating as
Cargill Value Added Meats/
240 Graham Avenue, Suite #300
Winnipeg, Manitoba

Matter:
Occupational health and safety

Conviction:
Occupational Health and Safety Act
Section 25(2) (a)

Crown Counsel:
Mike Nicol


Title : Read More CFIA Enforcement Due from April 04 2016 Onwards

: Admin | : 2017-06-10


On April 4, 2016, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) will begin its full enforcement of the new Halal labelling and advertising certification requirements, following a two-year transition period of the amended Food and Drug Regulations. The Regulation came after Halal food consumers had expressed concerns about the difficulty of making informed purchase decisions.

In Canada, Halal claims are voluntary. However, the new requirements will compel those manufacturers and advertisers who voluntarily use Halal claims to certify all such claims on food labels, packaging and advertising materials. The certification must be accompanied by the name of the person or organization that certified the product as Halal.

If the requirements are not met, the CFIA will enforce the new Regulations through its current label verification system and in response to complaints.


Title : HALAL BULLETIN Jan 10 2018 - Courtesy CFIA

: Admin | : 2018-01-26


In the labelling, packaging or advertising of a food, the Food and Drug Regulations prohibit the use of the word "halal" or any letters of the Arabic alphabet, or any other word, expression, depiction, sign, symbol, mark, device or other representation that indicates or that is likely to create an impression that the food is halal, unless the name of the person or body that has certified the food as halal is indicated on the label, package, or in the advertisement for that food [B.01.050, FDR].

The name of the certifying body or person is required where the claim is being made, whether that is on the label or the package or in the advertisement. Having the name of the certifying body or person on one of these elements does not preclude it from being required to appear on the other elements when a halal claim is made.

Acronyms and some company logos may not be easily recognizable to all consumers. Therefore, the complete name of the person or body that certified the food as halal must be present.

There are no specific requirements on the proximity of a halal claim and the name of the person or body that certified the food to one another.

The intent of the requirement is to provide additional information to consumers so as to enable them to make informed decisions about the food they purchase. Like all claims, halal claims must be truthful and not misleading.

HALAL - Method of Production Claims


Title : Canadian HACCP Certifying Agency - HACCP Updates

: Admin | : 2018-07-28


July 28 2018

Canadian HACCP Certifying Agency (CHCA) envisages the food safety matters in food plants and the priority goes to meat and meat products producing plants in Ontario. Food animals including avian species naturally carry pathogens in their intestinal tract that may be transferred on to raw meat products during slaughter and processing. The prevalence and concentration of Campylobacter and Salmonellain broiler chicken and chicken meat produced in Canada has always attracted the attention CFIA as it matters to the safety of consumers. 

For the purpose, in a study conducted by CFIA, the reported prevalence of Campylobacter on fresh abattoir and retail chicken products was estimated by combining the results of both qualitative and quantitative tests. A pooled caeca sample was collected from a set of 20 individual birds of the same lot or truck load at slaughter to estimate the prevalence of these foodborne pathogens in flocks and farms. The results of this study show that the prevalence of Campylobacter and Salmonella in broiler chicken lots raised on Canadian farms vary widely over seasons and provinces.

The national prevalence of Salmonella in broiler chicken lots was 25.6% (CI: 24.3% – 26.9%). The lots raised in eastern provinces were colonized more frequently with Salmonella with Ontario demonstrated the highest prevalence with 34.3% (CI: 31.4% – 37.2%). The national prevalence of Campylobacter in broiler chicken lots was 24.1% (CI: 22.8% – 25.4%), but the geographical distribution of positive lots increased gradually towards the west with British Columbia showing the highest prevalence at 41.3% (CI: 37.7% – 44.9%).

The prevalence of Salmonella on whole carcasses and parts processed in federally-registered establishments were significantly different at 16.9% (CI: 15.1% – 18.7%) and 29.6% (CI: 27.4% – 31.7%), respectively. Similarly, the prevalence of Campylobacter was significantly lower on whole carcasses at 27.4% (CI: 25.2% – 29.6%), compared to parts at 39.0% (CI: 36.7% – 41.4%). When analyzed separately, the prevalence of both pathogens in skinless and boneless (SLBL) breasts was not significantly different from the prevalence observed on skin-on and bone-in (SOBI) thighs.

This national MBS in broiler chicken provides current baseline estimates on the prevalence and concentration of Campylobacter and Salmonella at various stages along the broiler chicken meat supply chain. This information will be used as a science-based foundation by governments, industry and other stakeholders to inform the development of a risk management strategy for the control of Campylobacter and Salmonella in chicken produced in Canada. To achieve further reduction at processing or retail, a future strategy should consider the implementation of new interventions or mitigation measures along the supply chain from primary production to retail levels.

Keeping the meat and meat products safe is the safety of human lives and so is the safety of such a business. For a complete report on the matter, do connect to the 

National Microbiological Baseline Study in Broiler Chicken
December 2012 – December 2013 
Executive summary National Microbiological Baseline Study in Broiler Chicken December 2012 – December 2013 Executive summary


Title : Canadian HACCP Certifying Agency - HACCP Updates

: Admin | : 2018-07-28


July 28 2018

Canadian HACCP Certifying Agency (CHCA) envisages the food safety matters in food plants and the priority goes to meat and meat products producing plants in Ontario. Food animals including avian species naturally carry pathogens in their intestinal tract that may be transferred on to raw meat products during slaughter and processing. The prevalence and concentration of Campylobacter and Salmonellain broiler chicken and chicken meat produced in Canada has always attracted the attention CFIA as it matters to the safety of consumers. 

For the purpose, in a study conducted by CFIA, the reported prevalence of Campylobacter on fresh abattoir and retail chicken products was estimated by combining the results of both qualitative and quantitative tests. A pooled caeca sample was collected from a set of 20 individual birds of the same lot or truck load at slaughter to estimate the prevalence of these foodborne pathogens in flocks and farms. The results of this study show that the prevalence of Campylobacter and Salmonella in broiler chicken lots raised on Canadian farms vary widely over seasons and provinces.

The national prevalence of Salmonella in broiler chicken lots was 25.6% (CI: 24.3% – 26.9%). The lots raised in eastern provinces were colonized more frequently with Salmonella with Ontario demonstrated the highest prevalence with 34.3% (CI: 31.4% – 37.2%). The national prevalence of Campylobacter in broiler chicken lots was 24.1% (CI: 22.8% – 25.4%), but the geographical distribution of positive lots increased gradually towards the west with British Columbia showing the highest prevalence at 41.3% (CI: 37.7% – 44.9%).

The prevalence of Salmonella on whole carcasses and parts processed in federally-registered establishments were significantly different at 16.9% (CI: 15.1% – 18.7%) and 29.6% (CI: 27.4% – 31.7%), respectively. Similarly, the prevalence of Campylobacter was significantly lower on whole carcasses at 27.4% (CI: 25.2% – 29.6%), compared to parts at 39.0% (CI: 36.7% – 41.4%). When analyzed separately, the prevalence of both pathogens in skinless and boneless (SLBL) breasts was not significantly different from the prevalence observed on skin-on and bone-in (SOBI) thighs.

This national MBS in broiler chicken provides current baseline estimates on the prevalence and concentration of Campylobacter and Salmonella at various stages along the broiler chicken meat supply chain. This information will be used as a science-based foundation by governments, industry and other stakeholders to inform the development of a risk management strategy for the control of Campylobacter and Salmonella in chicken produced in Canada. To achieve further reduction at processing or retail, a future strategy should consider the implementation of new interventions or mitigation measures along the supply chain from primary production to retail levels.

Keeping the meat and meat products safe is the safety of human lives and so is the safety of such a business. For a complete report on the matter, do connect to the 

National Microbiological Baseline Study in Broiler Chicken
December 2012 – December 2013 
Executive summary National Microbiological Baseline Study in Broiler Chicken December 2012 – December 2013 Executive summary


Title : Question: Hand Slaughtered or Machine Slaughtered ?

: Admin | : 2018-10-07


Oct. 04 2018

Dear Enquirer: Peace Be Unto You

Technically, both system of slaughtering are Halal. On individual basis, on small production, one could appoint a Muslim person who uses knife and slaughters the chicken. On mass production, Automation helps produce Halal Slaughtered Chicken on mass scale.

It is up to an individual, what perception he / she keeps in mind. Of course, the customer is always right but the suppliers of the Halal Chicken may or may not agree with such a customer and so the resources provided.

All Halal Certifying Agencies commit to the Halal Islamic Jurisprudence as all would be accountable to Lord Almighty on the Day of Resurrection.

To make it clear for you Vince, I have clarified the details as per the following explanation. We at Canadian Halal Food Certifying Agency (CHFCA) support both of the process with strict Halal Quality Assurance Protocol.

HALAL SLAUGHTERING:

All lawful land animals should be slaughtered in compliance with the rules laid down in the Islamic Jurisprudence in priority, collectively agreed upon Islamic jurisdictions in Canada, followed by Codex Recommended Code of Hygienic Practice for Fresh Meat, Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) recommended guidelines and the following requirements:

  • The person should be a Muslim who is mentally sound and knowledgeable of the Islamic slaughtering procedures.
  • The animal to be slaughtered should be lawful according to Islamic law.
  • The animal to be slaughtered should be alive at the time of slaughtering.
  • The phrase Bismillah Allohu Akbar (In the Name of Allah - God is Greatest) should be invoked immediately before the slaughter of each animal.
  • The slaughtering device should be sharp and should not be lifted off the animal during the slaughter act.
  • The slaughter act should sever the Pulmonary, Esophagus, Jugular and Carotid of the neck region.

Machine Slaughtered Chicken:

Slaughtering of chicken through automation also requires at least a Muslim man who recites “In the name of God – God is Greater” on the chicken which are slaughtered by the automatic slaughtering blade with pre-determined measurement cutting carotid, jugular, pulmonary and oesophageal lines in the neck.  In order for chickens slaughtered by machine to be Halal, the following conditions must be strictly met. If they are not met, the poultry will be considered Non-Halal:

The machine operator and or slaughterer must be sane and Muslim, Jew or Christian. A blessing or recitation incorporating the name of Almighty God must be articulated by the above operator when pressing the button to turn the machine on. The recitation is "In the name of God – God is Greater."

A blessing or recitation incorporating the name of Almighty God must be articulated by the same operator on each and every chicken that is being slaughtered. Chickens must be alive during the ritual slaughter.

The slaughtering person who slaughters missed birds by the machine, must be a Muslim, Jew or Christian.

One should note that in mass production, with machine slaughter, requires Halal Quality Assurance to meet the critical demands of being Halal.

"So eat of that [meat] upon which the name of God has been mentioned, if you are believers in His verses" (Qur’an: 6:119).

"And do not eat of that upon which the name of God has not been mentioned, for indeed, it is grave disobedience" (Qur’an: 6:121).

"The food of those who were given the Scripture (religious Jews and Christians) is lawful for you and your food is lawful for them" (Qur’an 5:5).

Thank you my friend for asking the question.

 

Imam Qamrul Khanson

Director: HACCP and Halal Food Certification

Call Us: 905 673 6500 (O) / 647 833 8453 (Cell)

Write through E-Mail: info@chfcahalal.com

Learn through Web: www.chfcahalal.com   

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